If you're not already familiar with pizzelle they're a delicious treat that are simple to make, requiring nothing more than a few basic ingredients. Typically pizzelle are round and flat and come embossed with a distinctive snowflake pattern. They originate from Italy and are traditionally flavored with anise (although today they come in many different flavors).

photo credit: prouditaliancook.com
I won't bother listing a pizzelle recipe here since there are already so many published online. A quick search should give you a basic recipe in no time. But what I will do is list my own personal 'success list' for making, what I consider, the perfect pizzelle. After all you can't beat a bit of home cooking and pizzelle are a great place for beginners to start because of their simplicity.

One of the most basic things that catches most people out (myself included) is simply using your pizzelle maker correctly. You need to make sure it is fully heated. So before you even begin making your pizzelle batter, switch your maker on and allow it to heat fully. If you don't you're going to end up with a sticky mess that runs out of the mold when you close it. And it's a real bugger to clean off.

Speaky of sticky messes I'd recommend putting a non-stick spray or lightly rubbing a small amount of vegetable oil into your pizzelle maker before using it to help season it - especially if its new. Do this even if your maker states its non stick because my pizzelle still sometimes stick in my non-stick maker - go figure!
Also play around with your temperature controller if your maker has one. I like my pizzelle a light golden brown. But you may prefer yours a darker golden color. Your temperature controller will allow you to do this. So make a few batches varying different times and temperatures and you'll come up with a combination that makes your perfect pizzelle. My maker doesn't have a temperature control, which I think would be handy, but I know that one minute is the 'optimum' time for me. (If you're in the market for a pizzelle maker I picked my one up at this site).

photo credit: naplesillustrated.com
You could also get a few forms for your baked pizzelle. You see, when pizzelle are warm, they can be shaped around a mold to make cones or cylinders which harden when they set. To form something like a sugar cone. You can then fill them with ice cream or custard and crème - whatever you want really. I like this because I do prefer my pizzelle warm and fresh - actually when I'm making anything I always prefer it fresh from the oven. So this is a good way to make some really nice stuff to snack on later - that's just as delectable as the fresh pizzelle.

Well, there you have it. My round up of tips for making a decent pizzelle. The tips sound basic, and I suppose they are, but it is so surprising just how easy you forget the basics when you're making something new so it's handy to have a little crib sheet to guide you through.



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